AMERICAN DREAMER: Davey Moore TKO6 Tadashi Mihara

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“Get the TV on the pretty things,” Moore says, holding two oversize trophies in the ring, smiling, oblivious, like we all are, to what we cannot know about tomorrow.

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February, 1982.  With only eight pro fights under his belt, they sent Davey Moore to the Land of the Rising Sun on a mission.  Moore, out of the South Bronx wasteland of Melrose, was a cloak and dagger pawn for Bob Arum, who had tapped the taboo South African market in the name of laissez faire.   For “Bottom Line Bob,” apartheid was a mere afterthought.  But when Japan refused to let WBA junior middleweight champion Tadashi Mihara fight Pretoria native Charlie “The Silver Assassin” Weir on political grounds, Arum sent a cocky Bronxite with a concrete left hook and a cockeyed grin to be his emissary—or soldier of fortune.  Moore, 22, was a phenom as an amateur: successful against international competition, a 4-time Golden Gloves champion, and an Olympic Trials finalist.  As a neophyte pro—and a natural hot dog—he showed the all-action style that would leave Mihara in smithereens at the Metropolitan Gym in Tokyo before an audience so stunned into silence you can almost hear the ropes quivering.   When you recall his exuberance and his speed—punctuated by that victory lap around the ring—you can almost forget what the dark future held for Davey Moore.  But almost, of course, is always never enough.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W99uKNILAK4&w=560&h=315]

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Tags: Boxing Davey Moore Sports

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